Upper School
Academics

College Counseling

At some point in your high school search process you might find yourself asking, “Why would I send my child to a college prep school? And is there really a difference between all of the college prep schools in Austin?” The answer is a resounding YES. While many schools can boast lists of college acceptances that represent the wide range of interests and levels of ambitions of their students, those lists don’t tell the whole story. St. Andrew’s certainly has that robust college list but the rest of the story is what we’re most proud of: we do college counseling differently.
 
Just as you are looking for a great match for your child in high school, we aim to help students find great matches for college. Our College Counseling Program is very personal: our student-to-counselor ratios are low (average 9:1) and the process is meticulously planned and thoughtfully executed. Because we have the ability to provide personal attention to each of our students, our counselors are able to recognize and recommend schools that are especially good matches for students. This goes above and beyond just “finding” the right college — our counselors are personal advocates for every student; writing letters of recommendation, serving both parents and students throughout the process and beyond. These personal touches are the differences; these are the valuable components of our program that cannot be easily duplicated.
 
How does it all work? We start early. After students get their feet firmly planted in the routine of high school life in ninth and tenth grade - which involves creating passionate learners, developing strong study skills, exploring different interests, and engaging in the life of the school community — they are ready for the next step toward college exploration. We begin our purposeful college prep work with juniors when they are developmentally able to think about college in a meaningful and tangible way. The college counselors help guide students and parents as they learn about a variety of schools, create a list of reasonable options, complete the application process, and select a collegiate program in which they can thrive. A great match is one in which the needs, abilities, and desires of a student are all met.
 
Our difference is a personal one. Each college counselor is personally invested in the success of your child not ONLY at St. Andrew’s but beyond. Our commitment to your child is long-term and St. Andrew’s College Counseling Program is intentionally designed to ensure that every student's next big step in life is made with support, guidance, and great care.

List of 3 items.

  • Class of 2017 Acceptances (* indicates matriculation to this school)

    The University of Alabama
    Allegheny College* 
    American University 
    The American University of Paris*
    Arizona State University
    The University of Arizona
    University of Arkansas
    Auburn University
    Austin College
    Austin Community College*
    Baldwin Wallace University*
    Bard College
    Baylor University*
    Belmont University*
    Bentley University
    Binghamton University
    Boston University 
    Bradley University
    University of British Columbia
    Bucknell University 
    University of California, Davis
    University of California, Los Angeles
    University of California, Merced
    University of California, San Diego
    California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo 
    CAP21 Performing Arts Conservatory
    Carleton College*
    Carnegie Mellon University* 
    Case Western Reserve University
    Centre College*
    Chapman University* 
    College of Charleston* 
    University of Chicago
    University of Cincinnati
    Clark University* 
    Clemson University 
    Coastal Carolina University
    University of Colorado at Boulder*
    University of Colorado at Colorado Springs
    Colorado College
    Colorado School of Mines*
    Colorado State University
    Columbia College Chicago
    Columbia University
    Cornell University*
    University of Dallas
    Denison University*
    University of Denver
    DePaul University 
    Dickinson College*
    Dominican University of California
    Drew University 
    Drexel University
    Duke University* 
    Earlham College
    Eastman School of Music of the University of Rochester* 
    Eckerd College
    Elon University
    Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
    Emerson College
    Emory University 
    University of Evansville*
    Florida Institute of Technology
    University of Florida
    Fordham University
    Franklin and Marshall College 
    Furman University* 
    Georgetown University 
    Georgia Institute of Technology*
    The University of Georgia*
    University of Glasgow*
    Grinnell College
    Hendrix College
    High Point University
    Hobart & William Smith Colleges 
    Hofstra University*
    Hope College 
    University of Houston
    Howard University
    Illinois Wesleyan University
    Indiana University at Bloomington
    Iowa State University
    The University of Iowa
    Ithaca College 
    Johns Hopkins University
    University of Kansas
    Kenyon College
    King's College London
    Knox College
    University of LaVerne
    Lehigh University
    Linfield College
    Louisiana State University
    Loyola Marymount University*
    Loyola University Chicago*
    Loyola University New Orleans*
    Macalester College
    The University of Manchester
    Manhattan School of Music*
    University of Mary Hardin-Baylor
    Marymount Manhattan College
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst
    University of Miami
    Michigan State University
    University of Michigan
    Millikin University
    Millsaps College
    University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
    University of Mississippi*
    Missouri University of Science and Technology
    Mount Holyoke College
    New York Film Academy 
    New York University* 
    The New School 
    University of North Carolina at Asheville
    North Carolina State University
    University of North Texas*
    Northeastern University
    University of Northern Colorado 
    University of Notre Dame
    Occidental College 
    Ohio Northern University
    The Ohio State University 
    Ohio Wesleyan University
    The University of Oklahoma*
    Oklahoma City University
    University of Oregon 
    Otterbein University
    Pace University, New York City
    Pennsylvania State University
    University of Pittsburgh
    University of Pittsburgh at Bradford
    University of Portland
    Pratt Institute
    University of Puget Sound
    Purchase College State University of New York
    Purdue University*
    Queens University of Charlotte
    University of Redlands
    Reed College 
    University of Rhode Island*
    Rhodes College*
    Rice University*
    University of Richmond*
    Rider University
    University of Rochester
    Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology*
    Saint Anselm College
    Saint Louis University, Madrid
    University of San Diego
    University of San Francisco
    Santa Clara University*
    Santa Fe University of Art and Design
    Savannah College of Art and Design
    Seattle University
    Sewanee: The University of the South
    Skidmore College 
    University of South Carolina* 
    University of Southern California
    Southern Methodist University*
    Southwestern University*
    University of St. Andrews
    St. Edward's University*
    Stanford University*
    SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
    Syracuse University
    The University of Tampa
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
    Texas A&M University*
    Texas Christian University*
    Texas State University
    Texas Tech University*
    The University of Texas, Austin*
    The University of Texas, Dallas*
    The University of Texas, San Antonio*
    University of Toronto*
    Trinity University*
    Tulane University*
    University of Tulsa
    The University of the Arts
    University of Utah
    University of Vermont
    Villanova University 
    University of Virginia*
    Virginia Tech
    Wagner College
    Washington College 
    University of Washington*
    Washington University in St. Louis*
    Webster University
    Wellesley College
    Westminster Choir College of Rider University
    Whitman College
    Whittier College
    Willamette University
    University of Wisconsin
    Worcester Polytechnic University
    Wright State University 
    Yale University* 




  • Class of 2016 Acceptances (*indicates matriculation to this school)

    Adams State University*
    Agnes Scott College
    The University of Alabama
    Allegheny College
    American University* 
    Arizona State University 
    University of Arkansas
    Austin College*
    Austin Community College*
    Bard College
    Bates College 
    Baylor University*
    Belmont University
    Bentley University 
    Blinn College
    Boston College*
    Boston University
    Brown University*
    Bryn Mawr College
    Butler University
    California Polytechnic State University
    University of California, Davis
    University of California, Los Angeles*
    University of California, San Diego
    University of California, Santa Barbara
    Carleton College*
    Carnegie Mellon University*
    Case Western Reserve University*
    The Catholic University of America
    Chapman University*
    College of Charleston
    Clark University
    Clarkson University
    Clemson University
    Colby College*
    Colgate University
    University of Colorado at Boulder*
    University of Colorado at Colorado Springs
    Colorado College*
    Colorado School of Mines
    Colorado State University*
    Concordia University Texas
    University of Connecticut*
    Cornell College
    Cornell University* 
    Denison University 
    University of Denver*
    DePaul University (The Theater School)*
    Drake University
    Earlham College
    Eckerd College
    University of Edinburgh*
    Elon University 
    Emerson College 
    Emory University 
    Fordham University
    Fort Lewis College
    Furman University*
    The University of Georgia
    Georgia Institute of Technology*
    Gettysburg College
    University of Glasgow
    Gonzaga University
    Goucher College
    Grinnell College
    University of Houston 
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Indiana University at Bloomington
    University of Kansas
    Kenyon College*
    Lake Forest College
    Lehigh University*
    Lewis & Clark College*
    Louisiana State University*
    Louisiana Tech University
    Loyola Marymount University*
    Loyola University Chicago
    Loyola University New Orleans
    Marist College
    University of Mary Hardin-Baylor
    University of Maryland, College Park
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology*
    University of Miami
    University of Michigan*
    Michigan State University
    Middlebury College
    Millsaps College*
    University of Mississippi
    Monmouth University
    Montana State University, Bozeman
    Mount Holyoke College
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    North Carolina State University 
    University of North Texas
    Northeastern University*
    Oberlin College 
    Occidental College 
    The Ohio State University
    University of Oklahoma
    University of Oregon*
    Oregon State University
    University of Puget Sound
    Purdue University
    University of Redlands*
    Reed College
    Rhodes College*
    Roanoke College
    Rollins College
    University of San Diego*
    University of San Francisco
    Sarah Lawrence College 
    Savannah College of Art and Design*
    Scripps College*
    Seattle University*
    Sewanee: The University of the South*
    Skidmore College
    Smith College 
    University of South Carolina*
    University of Southern California* 
    Southern Methodist University*
    Southwestern University*
    University of St. Andrews
    St. Edward's University*
    Sul Ross State University*
    Tarleton State University
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
    Texas A&M University*
    Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi*
    Texas Christian University
    Texas State University*
    Texas Tech University
    The University of Texas, Arlington*
    The University of Texas, Austin*
    The University of Texas, Dallas
    The University of Texas, San Antonio
    Transylvania University*
    Trinity University*
    Tulane University
    University of Tulsa
    Vanderbilt University* 
    University of Vermont
    Villanova University*
    University of Virginia*
    Virginia Tech
    Wake Forest University 
    University of Washington 
    Washington University in St. Louis*
    Wellesley College*
    Western Washington University*
    Whitman College
    Whittier College
    Willamette University
    College of William and Mary
    University of Wisconsin, Madison*
    Wofford College 

  • Class of 2015 Acceptances (* indicates matriculation to this school)

    University of Alabama*
    Allegheny College*
    American University*
    The American University of Paris
    Angelo State University
    Arizona State University
    University of Arizona
    University of Arkansas*
    Auburn University*
    Austin College
    Austin Community College*
    Bard College
    Bard College Berlin
    Barnard College
    Bates College
    Baylor University*
    Bennington College
    Boston College
    Boston University
    Bowdoin College*
    Butler University
    California Polytechnic State University*
    University of California, Los Angeles*
    University of California, San Diego
    University of California, Santa Barbara
    University of California, Santa Cruz
    Carleton College*
    Carnegie Mellon University
    Case Western Reserve University
    Chapman University
    University of Chichester
    Clemson University*
    Coastal Carolina University
    Colby College
    Colgate University
    University of Colorado at Boulder*
    Colorado College*
    Colorado School of Mines
    Colorado State University*
    Columbia College Chicago
    Cornell College
    Davidson College
    University of Dayton
    University of Delaware*
    Denison College
    University of Denver*
    DePaul University
    Dickinson College
    Drake University
    Drexel University
    Duke University*
    Earlham College
    Elon University
    Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University*
    Emerson College
    Emory University
    Fairfield University*
    Florida State University
    Fordham University
    Franklin and Marshall College
    Furman University
    George Mason University
    George Washington University
    Georgia Institute of Technology*
    University of Georgia*
    Gettysburg College
    Gonzaga University
    Gustavus Adolphus College
    Hendrix College
    Hofstra University
    College of the Holy Cross*
    University of Houston
    Indiana University at Bloomington
    Ithaca College
    James Madison University
    Juniata College
    University of Kansas*
    Kenyon College
    King's College London*
    Lafayette College
    Lehigh University
    Lewis and Clark College
    University of London, Royal Holloway
    Louisiana State University*
    Loyola Marymount University
    Macalester College
    Marist College*
    Marquette University
    University of Mary Washington
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst
    McDaniel College
    McGill University*
    McLennan Community College
    University of Memphis
    Menlo College
    University of Miami
    University of Michigan*
    Middlebury College
    Millsaps College
    University of Mississippi
    Missouri University of Science and Technology
    Mount Holyoke College
    Muhlenberg College
    New College of Florida
    New York University
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    North Carolina State University
    University of North Texas
    Northeastern University
    Northern Arizona University
    Nova Southeastern University
    University of Oklahoma
    University of Oregon
    Pace University
    Pacific Lutheran University
    Princeton University*
    University of Puget Sound​
    Purdue University
    Reed College
    University of Redlands
    Regent's University London
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
    Rhodes College*
    Rice University*
    University of Richmond*
    Saint Louis University
    Saint Mary's College of California
    St. Olaf College
    University of San Diego
    San Diego State University
    University of San Francisco
    Santa Clara University
    Savannah College of Art and Design*
    Seattle University
    Sewanee: The University of the South*
    Skidmore College*
    Smith College
    University of South Carolina
    University of Southern California*
    Southern Methodist University*
    Southern New Hampshire University
    Southwestern University*
    University of St. Andrews - Scotland*
    St. Edward's University
    St. Olaf College*
    Stanford University*
    Sweet Briar College
    Temple University
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville*
    Texas A&M University*
    Texas Christian University*
    Texas State University*
    Texas Tech University*
    University of Texas, Austin*
    University of Texas, Dallas
    University of Texas, San Antonio*
    Trinity University*
    Tulane University*
    Union College
    University of Utah
    Vanderbilt University*
    Vassar College
    Villanova University
    University of Virginia*
    Wake Forest University
    University of Washington*
    Webster University
    Wesleyan University
    West Virginia University
    Western State Colorado University
    Whitman College
    Whittier College
    Willamette University
    University of Wisconsin
    Wofford College
    Worcester Polytechnic Institute
    Yale University*
     
     
     

     
     



List of 4 items.

  • The Counseling Process

    Our curriculum is challenging and prepares students for the work they will encounter in college as well as the SAT, ACT, and Advanced Placement tests. Additionally, our graduation requirements are in-line with the expectations of selective colleges. The college counseling process described below supplements this strong foundation as students rise from freshmen to seniors.

    Although the "formal" college counseling process begins during the fall of the junior year, the process truly begins when a student enters St. Andrew's School. As students transition to the Upper School, our teachers and advisors work with students to select appropriate courses that maximize their potential. Ninth- and tenth-grade students are encouraged to concentrate on establishing their academic record. Students are advised to pursue the strongest academic program that is appropriate for them. The faculty helps students develop good study habits and urges them to explore activities where they might become leaders as juniors and seniors. Students are also advised to develop special interests or talents beyond the classroom. There are plenty of opportunities for students to thrive as leaders, both in their academic and extracurricular pursuits, at St. Andrew's.

    Additionally, tenth and eleventh graders take the PSAT each fall. Sophomores take it to become more familiar with this sort of test. Juniors take it as a qualifying test for the National Merit Corporation. Results provide information that can be used to help improve performance on subsequent tests.

    After juniors take the PSAT in October, they begin individual meetings with the college counselors.  In those meetings we make sure that testing plans are in place, talk about possible senior year courses, and begin to draft a list of colleges to explore.  After the Christmas break, the college counselors gather with the juniors and their parents to explain the calendar for the year ahead as it relates to college admissions. And beginning after spring break, students and their families begin individual meetings with their designated college counselor. At those meetings, preferences for colleges are discussed and a plan for the summer and the senior year is devised. This plan includes a review of the student's senior course load as well as suggestions for summer activities as they relate to the college search.

    Throughout the senior year, students meet with their college counselor on a daily basis during advisory time. While the focus of these gatherings is not always on college, the relationship formed is crucial to the individual counseling that takes place at St. Andrew's. Advisory groups grow together over the year, and college counselors get to know their advisees quite well so that any advocating on their behalf can be done with great confidence and knowledge. By the spring of the senior year, it is the aim of the college counseling program that the seniors all have choices about where they will attend college.

    The College Counseling Process by Year
    9th Grade
    The groundwork for successful college acceptance is laid by encouraging students to do their best academically, to get involved in a variety of extracurricular activities, and to choose interesting summer projects. To educate our parents so that they feel more confident about the process that their students will be following in the years ahead, we host a College 101 program each January for the parents of our 8th and 9th graders.  At that program we discuss the college admissions process and hear from a financial aid professional.   

    10th Grade
    Each fall, we host a College Admissions Panel with college admissions officers from around the country.  We invite tenth graders and their parents to attend so that they can hear about how the application review process works in different types of colleges, what college admissions officers are really looking for in strong applicants, and other important and interesting information about the college selection process. In October, students take the PSAT (Preliminary SAT) as practice for test-taking with this examination format.  They also continue to build an academic resume that reflects their best work while getting/staying involved in an extraurricular activity at school or outside of school.  After the 10th grade, students might embark upon their Jr. Experience.    

    11th Grade
    In October, students take the PSAT again, potentially qualifying them for National Merit Scholarships.  Additionally, we invite juniors to meet with the Director of College Counseling or the Associate Director of College Counseling in late fall to develop an individualized plan for each student.  This plan includes a timeline for taking either the SAT or ACT, a discussion of senior year courses, a conversation about college thoughts, and results in a follow-up email that includes a list of schools to research.  We encourage students to visit at least one or two colleges during the junior year. We ask students to take the SAT and/or ACT at least once in the junior year.  And we suggest that some will want to take a Subject Test or two at the end junior year.  Many will also take an Advanced Placement exam in May of the junior year depending on whether or not a student has taken relevant coursework. Juniors are invited to college rep visits that happen on the St. Andrew’s campus; we encourage them to attend college fairs that are held in Austin throughout the year; and by the spring, each junior has been paired with a college counselor and students, parents, and college counselors meet to map out a plan for the summer and early fall of the senior year. If students have not already done so, students will complete their Jr. Experience after 11th grade. 

    12th Grade
    As seniors return to campus each August, we hope that they have dedicated some of their summer to developing a resume, researching colleges, and brainstorming colleges (as well as how to be a leader).  Each October, when the sophomores and juniors are taking the PSAT, the seniors meet with classmates and teachers to edit college essays.  It is an invaluable day!  Additionally, students will take the SAT and/or ACT on various test dates throughout the year.  With daily meetings with their advisors, there is really no stone left unturned in this process. 

    In January of the senior year, we meet with seniors and their parents to talk about the process of ‘leaving home’ before many of the “symptoms” of that process actually begin to manifest themselves.  As a result of this evening of honest conversation and heartfelt sharing, our families feel better prepared for the months between the submission of college applications, the decisions that are delivered from colleges, the deliberations about where to go to college, and, ultimately, the final act of leaving home.    
    The final choice of where a student will apply to college is a detailed process.  It involves careful study of college information; a thorough assessment of the student's interests, talents, and ambitions; and a realistic appraisal of admissions possibilities. The student, with the consultation of parents, advisor, and other faculty, makes all the most important decisions. By May, each senior will have decided where to enroll for post-secondary education.

    For details on the SAT and Advanced Placement exams, consult The College Board. The College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) code for St. Andrew's Episcopal School is 440-343. For information on the ACT Assessment, check The ACT website. It is also worth noting that some colleges require neither the SAT nor the ACT for their admissions process.  A list of these test optional schools can be found here.  
  • FAQ

    Q. How will St. Andrew's help prepare my student for college?
    A. St. Andrew's curriculum and graduation requirements ensure that students have had enough challenging and diverse experiences, both in and out of the classroom, so that they are interesting candidates for colleges/universities. Additionally, the individual attention that each student receives through the college application and selection process helps to match students with schools in which they will thrive.  (See the college counseling section of the website for more details about the college counseling process at St. Andrew's.)
     
    Q. What is the average SAT score of St. Andrew's students?
    A. For the most recent graduating class (2015):
    SAT (83 test takers)
    - Critical Reading: 632
    - Mathematics: 631
    - Writing: 631
    ACT (83 test takers)
    - Composite Score: 28
     
    Q. Does St. Andrew's rank?
    A. St. Andrew's does not rank its students. This is common practice at many private, independent schools where small class sizes can throw off the ranking system substantially.  According to the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC), “Nearly one-third of high schools do not report class rank information to colleges. Accordingly, colleges have de-emphasized class rank as a factor in the admission decision over the past decade.”  

    Q. How does not ranking affect St. Andrew's students when they apply to a state school like UT or A&M?
    A. It means that our St. Andrew's students are not admitted to schools based on the one factor of rank - which other schools determined based on GPAs of students.  It does not mean that our students are not admitted to these schools! (In fact, over the past four years, we've sent more graduates to UT than anywhere else.) Our students undergo a thorough review process that allows public universities in Texas to look at GPA, standardized test scores, student essays, teacher and counselor recommendations, and extracurricular resumes. Essentially, they are reviewed holistically rather than being evaluated only by their grades.
     
    Q. Where do St. Andrew's students go to college?
    A. Our students go to schools in-state and out-of-state, in places as nearby as Tennessee and as far away as California. Our goal is to guide students towards academic institutions where they can grow and be challenged both in and out of the classroom. Since our first senior class graduated in 2002, our students have continued to be accepted to a diverse range of colleges and universities across the country.  In the Class of 2015, 60% of our class chose to attend school outside of Texas.
     
    Q. Do students have “excused absences” to visit colleges?
    A. Juniors are allowed three “excused absences” for college visits. Seniors get permission from their college counselors. (There is no set number of “excused absences” for seniors; college counselors approve visits.)
     
    Q:  How will I pay for college?
    Finances are on the minds of most of our families.  Our college counseling team has vast knowledge of schools that offer merit scholarships and the typical student profiles of those who receive scholarships from different schools.  Additionally, we alert students to other scholarship offers and nominate qualified students for special scholarships.  We offer families resources to learn more about need-based financial aid as well. Approximately 61% of our most recent graduating class received merit-aid from a host of colleges.

    For other questions, please consult the downloads section on the right of this same webpage or call the college counseling office.
  • Paying for College

    Paying for college is a reality that presents a challenge for many families. However, you can plan ahead by starting early to investigate available scholarship opportunities and options for financial aid. Students should definitely include parents in this process and may want to start a search for financial aid resources at FinAid, an excellent and comprehensive public service website. On FinAid, you can learn about the many available education savings plans, loans, and scholarships. FinAid includes sample forms and calculators so you can get down to the nitty gritty of dollars and cents. FinAid even has a page that highlights weird and wacky scholarships. There are also many websites and books that help you find scholarships and sources of money for college.

    Financial
    Aid Options and Sources
    There is "need-based" financial aid which is available primarily based on family need and "merit-based" financial aid which is granted regardless of family need. The three basic types of need-based financial aid are grants, loans, and work-study. Grants or scholarships are funds that do not have to be repaid. Loans are available to students (and parents) and are usually payable after you've graduated or left school. These loans often have lower interest rates than commercial loans. Work-study is a job arranged for you by the college. The funding for all three types of aid may come from federal, state, college, institutional, or private sources.
    Merit-based financial aid is a grant or scholarship awarded for academic, artistic, or athletic achievement, ethnic or religious background, intended field of study, or other criteria. These scholarships are granted by colleges, organizations, or other private sources regardless of family need.

    Qualifications for "Need-Based" Aid
    Some students don't apply for need-based financial aid because they think their families won't qualify. However, millions of students are receiving some type of financial aid every year.

    "Need" is defined as the difference between what it costs to attend a particular college (including tuition and cost of living) and what you and your family can afford to pay toward those costs ("expected family contribution"). Since the amount you can pay generally stays the same whether the costs are high or low, you would be eligible for different amounts of aid at different colleges. In fact, if you get all the financial aid for which you are eligible, you could end up paying the same amount at a high-cost college as you would at a lower-cost one.

    Your Expected Contribution
    Financial aid is intended to supplement, not replace, a family's resources. For that reason, most families should think of themselves as the primary source of funds for college. Almost all colleges, government agencies, and special programs that award aid expect you and your family to contribute as much as possible toward college costs.

    Figuring out how much each student and her family should pay is a fairly complicated process called "need analysis." A need analysis is performed using certain formulas for everyone who applies for aid. This involves an examination both of what the parents can pay toward college costs and what the student can contribute.

    Annual income is not the only factor that is considered in evaluating your eligibility for need-based financial aid. A family's assets are also considered, since a family with assets is assumed to be in a stronger financial position than a family with the same income but no assets.

    Finally, financial aid administrators know that each family situation is unique. Even though a standard formula is used to analyze your family's financial situation, individual circumstances are taken into account when your application for financial aid is considered. Be prepared, then, to help yourself, but know that if a college accepts you for admission, it will try to help you make your education affordable.


    Applying for Financial Aid

    Need-based Financial Aid

    There are two essential applications for need-based financial aid. Every student seeking need-based financial aid should file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA ) - available after January 1. Many colleges and universities require the CSS PROFILE as well as the FAFSA.

    In addition, some colleges and universities have their own applications for aid, and these must be submitted at the same time the student applies for admission.

    Note: Complete and submit your FAFSA application as soon as possible after January 1. Money is awarded from "pools" - the earlier you get your application in, the more money will be in the pools. The CSS PROFILE and FAFSA and outside scholarship forms will be made available to students as soon as the school receives them.

    Merit Scholarships
    Each year seniors from St. Andrew's are offered merit scholarships from colleges, or local or national organizations recognizing students' contributions to the community, leadership or special talents including academic achievement. Awards range from $1,000 to partial or full tuition -- often renewable over four years in college. In some instances, our students are asked to drive or fly to a campus to compete in several rounds of interviews to be considered for these awards. In other cases, they need only apply to a college or submit additional written information by a specific deadline.

    There are scholarships available from local and national organizations, corporations, and foundations. In general, these awards range from $500 to $2,000. Usually, a student must complete an application, write an essay, and provide a confidential recommendation as part of the process. Thankfully, the bulk of private scholarship application deadlines fall between January and May of senior year - after admission applications are complete.

    Once a student's college application list is set, students should check individual college/university websites for merit scholarships.

    Military Scholarships
    If you're interested in the military, you can apply for a ROTC Scholarship which is due December 1. Students who attend one of the military academies get a free education. If this interests you, check out:
    United States Military Academy
    United States Naval Academy
    United States Air Force Academy
    United States Coast Guard Academy
    United States Merchant Marine Academy
  • Helpful Resources

    Websites

    The College Board: Access registration for the SAT and Subject Tests as well as the CSS/Financial Aid Profile Application from this site. You will find practice questions and tips for taking standardized college entrance tests. Also, you can conduct a basic online college search through Big Future.

    ACT: Research and register for the ACT.

    Peterson's: Conduct a college search, apply to colleges online, look at college websites, and explore financial aid possibilities and resources for test prep. Petersons gives you access to more than 300 colleges and includes information about graduate and professional school programs as well as many other opportunities.

    Princeton Review: Practice exams for the SAT from Princeton Review . . . and they're free! Search for and apply to colleges using Apply! and research colleges using information from the Princeton Review's book, The Best 378Colleges. There are also feature articles about different aspects of the admissions process.

    College Net: This site has a college search, online college applications, and free financial aid and scholarship services.

    Common Application: Many students apply to schools using the Common Application - completing one application and submitting it to multiple schools. 

    ApplyTexas Application: A Texas "common application" that allows students to use one application to apply to mulitiple schools (most public institutions) in Texas.

    FastWeb: With $52 billion offered each year to students who want to go to college, this website tells you about 275,000 scholarships and grants that may be available to you and/or your family.

    Student Financial Assistance: From the US Department of Education, this provides information about federal programs.

    FAFSA on the web: Apply for financial aid with the online Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) between January 1st and February 1st to meet priority deadlines at most colleges. Remember to have your social security number, driver's license number, and last year's income tax forms for reference. Save all your data!

    Recommended Books
    Resources for learning more about colleges and universities.
    There are guides published annually by the College Board for test prep and college research purposes.
    Barron's Profiles of American Colleges (edited by College Division of Barron's Educational Series)
    The Best 379 Colleges (edited by Edward T. Custard, published by Princeton Review)
    The Fiske Guide to Colleges
    The Insider's Guide to the Colleges
    Peterson's Competitive Colleges
    Peterson's Honors Programs
    Peterson's 4-Year Colleges
    Colleges that Change Lives: 40 Schools You Should Know About Even if You're Not a Straight-A Student
    Looking Beyond the Ivy League: Finding the College That's Right for You (Loren Pope)


    Books of Advice for the College Application/Decision Process
    The College Admissions Mystique (Bill Mayher)
    College Unranked: Ending the College Admission Frenzy  (The Educational Conservancy)
    The Fiske Guide to Getting into the Right College (Edward B. Fiske, Bruce G. Hammond)
    Visiting College Campuses (Janet Spencer, Sandra Maleson, published by the Princeton Review
    Acceptance (David Marcus)
    Admissions Confidential (Rachel Toor)
    Crazy U (Andrew Ferguson)
    College Admission: From Application to Acceptance, Step by Step (Robin Mamlet and Christine VanDeVelde)
    The New Rules of College Admissions (Stephen Kramer and Michael London)
    The Gatekeepers (Jacques Steinberg)
    The iConnected Parent: Staying Close to Your Kids in College (and Beyond) While Letting Them Grow Up (Barbara K. Hofer, Ph.D. and Abigail Sullivan Moore)

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  • Info for College Reps

    St. Andrew's Episcopal School (CEEB code: 440343) welcomes visits from college representatives. Click here to view our College Counseling Calendar. Time slots that might be available are:
    8:55-9:45
    9:50-10:40
    11:05-11:55
    12:00-12:50
    2:00-2:50
    2:55-3:45
    Please call or email Elizabeth Guice (512.299.9736, eguice@sasaustin.org) or Chad Fulton (512.299.9712, cfulton@sasaustin.org) to schedule your visit.
     
    For directions to our Upper School campus, please click here and choose the Southwest Parkway directions.

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Located in Austin, Texas, St. Andrew’s Episcopal School is a private co-ed elementary, middle and high school for grades K-12. Students benefit from dedicated faculty, a challenging academic program, fine and performing arts, competitive athletics, and a wide selection of extracurricular activities.